Tag: wide angle

New Canon EF Wide Angle Zoom Announced – 16-35mm f/4 IS USM L – $1,199 retail, No 14-24mm f/2.8 Though?!!!!!

Canon announced a new full frame EF 16-35mm f/4 IS USM L lens today. Positioned to replace the 17-40mm f/4. Should be a nice lens…perhaps Canon’s sharpest wide angle zoom in the lineup.

Canon EF 16-35mm f/4 IS USM, image from Canon press release

Canon EF 16-35mm f/4 IS USM, image from Canon press release

 

But….can we please have an awesome 14-24mm f/2.8 lens similar to the Nikon version? Or a 16-35mm f/2.8 mk iii ? Current Canon truly wide angle offerings are pretty weak with the exception of the 17mm ts-e, 24mm ts-e mk II and the new 24-70mm f/2.8 mk II (awesome lens).

 

Canon EF 16-35mm f/4 IS USM, image from Canon press release

Canon EF 16-35mm f/4 IS USM, image from Canon press release

The following is from the Canon press release:

Canon Broadens Its Imaging Lineup with Two New EF Ultra Wide-Angle Zoom Lenses and White EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera

High Performance Lenses Offer Optical Image Stabilizer and a Refined Compact Design; Lightweight EOS Rebel SL1 SLR Kit in White Available Soon
MELVILLE, N.Y., May 13, 2014 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is proud to announce two new wide-angle lenses and a new white color model of the EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR camera, just in time for summer. The introduction of the new Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM and the EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM wide-angle zoom lenses provides Canon digital SLR camera users with the ability to capture stunning photographs and videos of spacious landscapes and many other iconic scenes. The EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM lens is the first L-series wide-angle zoom lens equipped with image stabilization, providing professional photographers with expanded creative options, especially in low light. The EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM wide-angle lens is an affordable option for entry-level DSLR users looking to enhance their images and videos with unique and creative perspectives.

Since its introduction in March 2013, the EOS Rebel SL1, the world’s smallest and lightest digital SLR camerai, has provided photographers of all levels with a high-performance digital SLR in a small, compact camera body. The new white EOS Rebel SL1 Camera Kit is complemented by a matching white EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens and offers a stylish alternative for photographers who like to stand out from the crowd.

“Having just reached a milestone of producing 100 million EF lenses, Canon is dedicated more than ever before to its heritage of creating outstanding optics for photographers of all levels,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “The EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM and EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra-wide zoom lenses, when paired with Canon EOS Digital SLR cameras, are powerful tools that can enhance any photographer’s creativity. And new to the U.S. market, the white EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR camera with its companion white lens, provides users with high-quality images in a small, compact body that is easy to bring along on all their summer adventures.”

EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

Fully compatible with all EOS Digital SLR cameras including full-frame models like the EOS 5D Mark III and EOS 6D Digital SLR cameras, the compact and lightweight EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM ultra wide-angle zoom lens offers high image quality and an Optical Image Stabilizer (IS) for shake correction up to four shutter speed stepsii, making handheld shooting possible in dimly lit scenes where camera shake can occur. In addition, an intelligent CPU in the lens automatically selects the optimal IS mode by recognizing differences between normal handheld shots and panning. This technological advancement supports a greater range of creative expression for photographers in otherwise difficult shooting situations, such as dark indoor scenes where flash photography is prohibited, or in places where a tripod cannot be used, or when shooting at low ISO speeds.

The EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM ultra wide-angle zoom lens features newly developed, high quality Canon optics that incorporate three GMo (Glass-Molded) aspheric lens elements, including a large-diameter aspheric lens, which help improve image quality by correcting aberrations. Two additional UD lens elements help reduce chromatic aberration from edge to edge throughout the entire zoom range for excellent image quality with high resolution and contrast. The lens also features enhanced fluorine lens coatings on the front and rear lens surfaces to repel dust particles and help ensure superb color balance while minimizing ghosting. The inner focusing and ring USM offer silent, fast and accurate autofocusing. Full-time manual focus adjustment is available in autofocus (AF) mode. A nine-blade circular aperture creates beautiful, soft backgrounds. A new compact four-group zoom system provides a minimum focusing distance of 0.28m/11 inches throughout the zoom range and a maximum magnification of 0.23x at the telephoto end for outstanding performance.

EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

Created to be a great companion lens for the Canon EOS 70D, EOS Rebel T5i, EOS Rebel SL1 and other EOS Digital SLR cameras with APS-C size image sensors, the EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM lens expands Canon’s line of Stepping Motor (STM) lenses. For entry-level users, this affordable wide-angle lens offers the ability to shoot creative, high-quality images and video in tight indoor locations such as a cozy corner table in a restaurant or unique vacation photos where the subject is close up, yet the surrounding area can still fill the frame.

The EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra wide-angle zoom lens features a compact and lightweight design with an Optical Image Stabilizer for shake correction up to four shutter speed stepsiii, enabling handheld shooting in low light. The lens’ stepping motor and newly designed focus mechanism are ideal for Canon EOS Movie Servo AF (available on EOS 70D, EOS Rebel T5i and EOS Rebel SL1 cameras) to provide smooth, quiet and continuous autofocusing during video shooting, as well as when taking photos.

The EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra-wide zoom lens features one UD lens element to help reduce chromatic aberration throughout the zoom range for excellent image quality with high resolution and contrast. It also features enhanced multi-layer lens coatings to help ensure superb color balance while minimizing ghosting and flare, while a seven-blade circular aperture creates beautiful, soft backgrounds.

Compared to the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM wide-angle lens, the EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra wide-angle zoom lens is nearly 20% smaller and 38% lighter. When combined with a compact digital SLR, such as the Canon EOS Rebel SL1 camera, the smaller size makes it very convenient to carry with the camera when traveling. The compact four-group zoom optical system provides a maximum magnification of 0.15x at the telephoto end. The wide-angle zoom range of the new EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM is a perfect complement to the currently available EF-S 18-55mm IS and EF-S 55-250mm IS STM zoom lenses.

New Lens Availability

The Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM and the EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ultra-wide zoom lenses are scheduled to be available in June for estimated retail prices of $1,199.00 and $299.99, respectively. For more information about Canon EF Lenses visit: www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup.

White EOS Rebel SL1 Kit with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Availability

The Canon EOS Rebel SL1 and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens kit in white is scheduled to be available at the end of June for an estimated retail price of $749.99. For more information about the white Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Digital SLR Camera kit and the full list of product specifications, visit www.usa.canon.com/eos.

About Canon U.S.A., Inc.

Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions. With approximately $36 billion in global revenue, its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE:CAJ), ranks third overall in U.S. patents registered in 2013† and is one of Fortune Magazine’s World’s Most Admired Companies in 2014. In 2013, Canon U.S.A. has received the PCMag.com Readers’ Choice Award for Service and Reliability in the digital camera and printer categories for the tenth consecutive year, and for camcorders for the past three years. Canon U.S.A. is committed to the highest level of customer satisfaction and loyalty, providing 100 percent U.S.-based consumer service and support for all of the products it distributes. Canon U.S.A. is dedicated to its Kyosei philosophy of social and environmental responsibility. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company’s RSS news feed by visiting www.usa.canon.com/rss and follow us on Twitter @CanonUSA.

For media inquiries, please contact pr@cusa.canon.com.


24mm Comparison: Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L II vs. 24-70mm f/2.8L I vs. 24mm f/3.5L TS-E II

Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L II, 1/320th @ f/5.6, ISO 100, Full Res JPEG

 

About a month ago, I tested the new Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L II against many other top Canon 24mm lenses with a Canon 5d Mark III. Including the 24-70mm f/2.8L I, 24-105mm f/4 IS, 16-35mm f/2.8 I, 16-35mm f/2.8 II, 24mm f/1.4L I and 24mm TS-E f/3.5L II.

I shot all lenses as 24mm @ three different apertures, using live preview to focus, cable release, mirror lock up, etc. To make a long story short the brand new 24-70 mk II I was using was defective, not so great a copy aka victim of lens variation. Bad copy was returned, new one acquired. Happy to say new one performs much better. Sometime soon I will probably post the first round bad test photos anyway in case people would like to see the differences between the other lenses.

 

For the second round I decided not to compare as many lenses, just too busy. The following will compare the 24-70mm f/2.8L mk I against the mk II as well as the current 24mm TS-E II which I have found to be my favorite Canon 24mm lens as far as quality goes.

 

Here goes…

Point of focus for all images was the caution sign. Shot in RAW, ISO 100, mirror lock up, cable release, heavy tripod, live view focus. Processed jpegs in Lightroom 4.2. No output sharpening or lens corrections used. All side by sides are at 100%.

 

At f/2.8 near center of frame:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/2.8

 

f/5.6 near center:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/5.6, focus on the sign

 

f/5.6 bottom right corner:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/5.6, focus on the sign

 

f/5.6 left side middle:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/5.6, focus on the sign

 

f/11 towards the center:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/11, focus on the sign

 

f/11 bottom right corner:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/11, focus on the sign

 

f/11 bottom left corner:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/11, focus on the sign

 

f/11 left side, middle of frame:

Canon 24-70mm mk I vs mk II @ f/11, focus on the sign

 

Overall the new 24-70mm f/2.8L II lens is better (at least when you get a good copy) than the mark I. Always a good idea to test your gear whether you buy new or used, this isn’t the first time something like this has happened to me.

Wide open it is significantly sharper than the mk I. When stopped down the new one looks much better in the corners as well. There is more going on than just sharpness, other optical qualities seem improved. Better be for the dramatic price increase. It actually holds up well compared to the 24mm TS-E II when the TS-E is set for no movements. The TS-E still holds a slight edge, and of course has good amount of movements so still hard to beat for someone looking for a great 24mm lens on a Canon for landscapes or architecture.

Here are some more full res JPEG’s for your own comparisons:

24-70mm f/2.8L I, 24-70mm f/2.8L II and the 24mm f/3.5L TS-E II, zeroed out, no movements. All at f/5.6.     Zip file

 

– Jordan, December 2012


Mamiya / Phase One AF 28mm f/4.5 Aspherical Lens Review

I’m a real sucker for good wide angle lenses, and I’m constantly searching for a few ideal wide lenses for landscape and architectural shoots.  I’ll settle on something I really like, then get a new medium format digital back or camera that puts a hurt on my once “great” lens. So the search seems to go on forever.

The following short test is for the Mamiya AF 28mm f/4.5 Aspherical Lens, which Mamiya started producing a few years ago. Phase One makes one with their name on it as well…same lens. Now that Phase One and Mamiya have one website, I guess they’ll probably just produce one flavor now.  The lens will be used with a Phase One P65+ 60 megapixel medium format digital back.

In the past I’ve used the Mamiya 35mm AF lens as well as a Cambo RS with both the Schneider 5,6/24XL Apo-Digitar and the Schneider 5,6/35 XL Apo-Digitar.  I must say the Cambo RS setup with those lenses and a Phase One P45 back is awesome. There are some drawbacks with the Cambo RS though. Slower to work with, Lens cast issues (which are correctable but still a hassle) ergonomics, wires and cables aplenty as well as major light fall off in the corners. Yes you can use an expensive center filter and or correct in post.  The center filter takes around a 2 stop loss, and correcting in Capture One can add some noise in the corners as its basically brightening the corners around 2 stops. Maybe a review of that camera in near future.

I will be keeping the Cambo as its hard to beat in terms of quality, but there are times I need something a little faster or less clumsy. Basically the Cambo is like a traditional view camera, the Mamiya is an SLR.

Test setup all files:

Phase One AF body

Phase One P65+, ISO 50, RAW

Heavy tripod, cable release, mirror lock up, self timer, AF focus confirmation, slight breeze.

Capture One 6.3.3 on MAC, default lens correction settings= chromatic aberration enabled, Distortion enabled, all others off.

Default sharpening enabled, Amount 140, Radius 1, Threshold 1

 

Main Shot @ f/16  (a real beauty, I know):

Download the RAW file here

Download a JPEG here (full resolution, max quality, sRGB)

 

 

Below are 100% crops of the center (also what I focused on), the four different images are comparing different f stops (f/4.5, f/8, f/16, f/32)

100% Center Crop

 

Below are 50% crops of the center (also what I focused on), the four different images are comparing different f stops (f/4.5, f/8, f/16, f/32).

50% crops were done because this seems to be a good indicator of how the actual print will look on screen if printed at native size @ 240ppi on an Epson. Actual print size is around 28″ x 37.5″

50% center crops

 

Below are 100% crops of the bottom left, the four different images are comparing different f stops (f/4.5, f/8, f/16, f/32)

 

What I see:

F/4.5 – Some vignetting (correctable in post, doesn’t really bother me). Not as sharp as other apertures but still useable if needed.

F/8 – Really sharp in the center, slight vignetting, blue drill in corner not tack sharp mainly because of focus/distance not optical issues.

F/16 – Looks not too bad, chromatic aberrations seem under reasonable control in the trees too. There was a little breeze so look for stationary subjects as indicators of true sharpness. Blue drill in bottom left corner is pretty sharp. f/11 is obviously somewhere in between.  More than likely I will use f/8-f/16 in real world situations.

F/32 – Diffraction pretty obvious at 100%, at 50% its not horrible. I almost never use the smallest aperture on any lens I own.

 

After reviewing the results on screen, I decided to print a large print of roughly 28″ x 37.5″ @ 240ppi (which is the native pixel size) on my Epson 9800, premium luster epson paper, 2880i, profiled, etc.  I ended up using the f/16 image, I know its not necessarily the sharpest in the center but I was guessing at that print size and adding a little output sharpening it would be a good compromise.  For most of my landscape work I prefer most of the scene in focus.

Pixel peeping on screen only shows so much, I can’t remember the last time I went into a gallery and asked for a digital file of the work on display so I can zoom into 100-200% and make sure everything is in order. If it looks good hanging on a wall at a large print size, it’s good enough for me.

Overall the print looks great, at normal viewing distances and at up close pixel sniffing ranges.

– Jordan

 

 


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